Bob Seger - Her Strut




"Her Strut" is a song written by Bob Seger that was first released on his 1980 album Against the Wind. It was also released as the B-side of his single "The Horizontal Bop." Its lyrics are accused of objectifying women. The song was inspired by feminist icon Jane Fonda.


Like "The Horizontal Bop", and unlike the more successful previous singles from Against the Wind, "Her Strut" is a fast-paced rocker. Journalist Bill King described it as being "screechy voiced" and said it reminded him of the Eagles' song "The Long Run". Roy Trakin of The Daily News felt it lacked the drive of the more popular, slower songs from Against the Wind. But Arizona Daily Star critic Pam Parrish felt it has "the same rhythmic tension that characterized [earlier Seger fan favorites] 'The Fire Down Below' and 'Come to Poppa.'"


Some listeners criticized the lyrics of "Her Strut" for objectifying women. Music journalist Jimmy Guterman and arts editor Owen O'Donnell criticized "Her Strut" as a "bewildering lame ditty" whose singer "sounds like an aging high school football jerk who never grew out of thinking of 'girls' as either virgins or whores." Rolling Stone critic Dave Marsh criticized it for belittling women when they try to assert themselves. Seger objected to Marsh's accusation of misogyny stating "My God, I don't hate women. I'm for women standing up."






Lyrics



She's totally committed

To major independence

But she's a lady through and through

She gives them quite a battle

All that they can handle

She'll bruise some

She'll hurt some too

But oh they love to watch her strut

Oh they do respect her but

They love to watch her strut


Sometimes they'll want to leave her

Just give up and leave her

But they would never play that scene

In spite of all her talking

Once she starts in walking

The lady will be all they ever dreamed

Oh they'll love to watch her strut

Oh they'll kill to make the cut

They love to watch her strut


Yeah love to watch her strut

Watch her strut