Joan Jett - Crimson and Clover




"Crimson and Clover" is a 1968 song by American rock band Tommy James and the Shondells. Written by the duo of Tommy James and drummer Peter Lucia Jr., it was intended as a change in direction of the group's sound and composition.


"Crimson and Clover" was released in late 1968 as a rough mix after a radio station leaked it. It spent 16 weeks on the U.S. charts, reaching number one in the United States (in February 1969) and four other countries. The single has sold 5 million copies, making it Tommy James and the Shondells' best-selling song. (Note: the RIAA did not award a gold record so the 5 million sales number is not officially acknowledged.) It has been covered by many artists including Joan Jett and Prince.


The title, "Crimson and Clover", was decided before a song had been written for it. The combination of unknown meaning came to James as he was waking up, comprising his favorite color – crimson – and his favorite flower – clover. (There is also a species of clover native to Europe called the crimson clover.) A song to fit the phrase was written by Tommy James and bassist Mike Vale, but was scrapped.


His following collaboration with drummer Peter Lucia, Jr. was more successful (Lucia has said that he himself came up with the Crimson and Clover phrase while watching a high school football game between his hometown Morristown (NJ) Crimson and Hopatcong (green, or "clover")). During the song's production, Roulette Records wanted a new single, so the group agreed to release "Do Something to Me" to gain time to complete the song.






Lyrics



Ah, now I don't hardly know her

But I think I can love her

Crimson and clover


Ah, now when she comes walkin' over

Now I've been waitin' to show her

Crimson and clover

Over and over


Yeah, if I'm not such a sweet thing

I wanna do everything

What a beautiful feelin'

Crimson and clover

Over and over


Crimson and clover, over and over

Crimson and clover, over and over

Crimson and clover, over and over

Crimson and clover, over and over